Why I Chose To Become Wales’ Manager – Giggs

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New Wales boss Ryan Giggs says he has been unfairly criticised by fans, and a desire to reach a major tournament with the country “burns” inside him.

Giggs, 44, played 64 times for Wales between 1991 and 2007 but, despite a trophy-laden club career, did not appear at a major international finals.

He was criticised for regularly pulling out of squads, and especially for missing friendly matches.

“I think it is a bit unfair, but football is about opinions,” he said.

A Manchester United legend, Giggs is one of the most decorated footballers in history – winning 13 Premier League and two Champions League titles in 963 appearances for the Red Devils.

He has signed a four-year contract to succeed Chris Coleman, but is yet to decide on his backroom staff.

His first game in charge will be against China in Nanning on March 22.

‘I’ll give my all for Wales – as I did when I played’

Giggs, a former Wales captain, did not play in an international friendly between 1991 and 2000, leading some to question his commitment to the team.

He told BBC Sport Wales: “I played more than 1,000 games and I didn’t get there without managing myself.

“Early on in my career I had problems with my hamstrings and missed loads of United games, but the criticism I’m getting is something I just have to deal with by winning games.”

Giggs knows a key part of the job will be to form “good relationships” with clubs, and realises he will need to be flexible with them and his players.

“It’s about managing what is best for the player and also for the country,” he said.

“When you’ve got Champions League quarter-finals and you are asking the players to travel all around the world, it’s about striking that balance.

“I want all the players to report for every game. That is impossible for whatever reason, so you pick a squad, some pull out and that gives others a chance.”

Giggs is hopeful hard work and positive results will be enough to win over fans dubious about his appointment.

“Some will support you, some won’t,” he said. “The only way to change their mind is to give it your all, which I intend to do.

“I intend to be successful, I intend to win games, and that’s all I can do. Everything else is out of my hands.

“The people who have got an opinion of me not giving my all, I can promise you that I did when I played for Wales and I’ll continue to do that as Welsh manager.”

-BBC